Subject Character Virtue Development

The Science of Thinking Differently

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Jonathan Haidt. Photo courtesy of TED
Jonathan Haidt. Photo courtesy of TED

How to think differently was a theme that linked two recent episodes of On Being, the American Public Media radio show hosted by Krista Tippett. Both episodes, funded in part by the John Templeton Foundation, explored the idea that psychology is showing that changing our perception of ourselves and others can be achieved by recognizing how our views are intimately connected to our attitudes.

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Gratitude Summit Explores the Queen of the Virtues

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Artwork by Terri Friedman and her students at the California College for the Arts. Photo courtesy of GGSC.
Artwork by Terri Friedman and her students at the California College for the Arts. Photo courtesy of GGSC.

Studies have repeatedly confirmed that gratitude lies at the heart of joy. The scientific exploration of wellbeing, called positive psychology, continues to illuminate the ways in which the capacity to give thanks plays this critical role. It is the “queen of the virtues,” says Robert Emmons, one of the leading researchers in the field and professor of psychology at the University of California, Davis. And yet, Emmons has also observed that studying gratitude is often met by a marked resistance.

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Interactive Empathy Training Novel Nominated for Award

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An interactive graphic novel (IGN), designed to promote empathy among children in elementary school, has been chosen as a finalist in the interactive category for the 2014 Prix Jeunesse, the prestigious international award for children’s media. The novel is the creation of the Arthur Interactive Media Study (AIMS), funded through a grant from the John Templeton Foundation, and aims to foster understanding about the perspective of others.

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Giving Thanks is Good for You!

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Choosing to feel grateful can make a positive difference in your life, according to a growing body of research. This is a particularly significant finding because people often view saying thanks as a passive, passing gesture, rather than an active stance and engagement with life.

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